ABA Tax Section Fall Meeting in Austin

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Stephen and I are attending the fall ABA Tax Section meeting in Austin. There are panels about important procedural and administrative issues, including the new partnership audit regime (timely as my colleague Marilyn Ames and I are finishing up a chapter on that for the Saltzman/Book treatise), the many changes in Appeals Office procedures, how to navigate cases before the Office of Professional Responsibility, best practices in reading and drafting the various types of tax guidance, and the possible changes arising due to the tax aspects of healthcare reform.

This morning Stephen will be on a panel I am moderating  discussing Section 7434 and the private cause of action that it allows for fraudulently issued information returns. Joining him on the panel is Mandi Matlock, who splits her time between Mondrick & Associates and Texas Rio Grande Legal Aid (and who contributes to the Effectively Representing book and has also blogged for us). There are many interesting issues relating to Section 7434, including whether the statute supports a claim for improperly issued information returns arising in employee misclassification cases, whether a person who did not have a legal obligation to file the information return is potentially liable and how the courts have approached damages in the handful of cases that plaintiffs have won.

 

Leslie Book About Leslie Book

Professor Book is a Professor of Law at the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law.

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