Brief Follow up to Today’s Post on Refund Loans

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Today’s post noted that we are likely to hear from consumer groups regarding the return of refund loans. It turns out that yesterday the National Consumer Law Center issued a press release called Tax Time Kick-Off: Delays and Risks Await Many Taxpayers This Year, discussing some of this filing season’s challenges. In the release, the NCLC, which was a leading voice against the earlier use of refund loans, again warns consumers against their use:

Advocates recommend that taxpayers avoid no fee RALs if possible. One risk is that some unscrupulous tax preparers might charge more in their tax preparation fees to “no fee” RAL borrowers. Also, in the last tax season some lenders, such as EPS and River City Bank, appeared to actually impose a price for “no fee” RALs by charging a higher price for a refund anticipation check (RAC) if the preparer was offering these loans.

With RACs, the bank opens a temporary bank account into which the IRS direct deposits the refund. After the refund is deposited, the bank issues the consumer a check or prepaid card, minus tax preparation fees paid to the preparer, and closes the temporary account. RACs do not deliver refunds any faster than the IRS can, yet cost $25 to $60. Some preparers charge additional “add-on” junk fees for RACs, fees that can range from $25 to several hundred dollars.

The NCLC also discusses some of the other challenges this year, including the need for many taxpayers to get a renewed Taxpayer ID number (ITIN), the coming of private debt collectors and the need to select competent and honest preparers.

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Further note: I have updated the link to the IRS web page for this filing season.

Leslie Book About Leslie Book

Professor Book is a Professor of Law at the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law.

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