Designated (and other) Orders from January 15 through January 26

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The past two weeks of designated orders have been light which allows us to combine two weeks of orders and get back on schedule. Samantha wrote up the first set of orders and William wrote up the second set. They continue to do a great job combing through Tax Court orders to allow us to see what the Tax Court thinks is important and to provide a discussion of cases that generally go unobserved in the tax press. Included in the designated orders is more fall out from Graev. Keith

Designated Orders 1/15 – 1/19

In stark contrast to my pre-holiday week post, during the week of January 15 the Tax Court only found four orders worthy of “designated” status and three of the four were very brief. I discuss two below, the other two were: 1) another motion for summary judgment is scheduled for a hearing so respondent can address how the Graev III decision may impact the motion and the case (here); and 2) an order granting a hearing on a motion to dismiss for lack of prosecution (here).

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Disallowing Extension is Not Abuse of Discretion

Docket No. 16456-17 L, John Lucian v. C.I.R. (Order here)

This designated order was the lengthiest of the group and is somewhat unique because the petitioner is represented by counsel, however, the mistake made by petitioner’s counsel is one pro se petitioners frequently make. Petitioner’s counsel did not provide the IRS with a financial statement, and thus, foreclosed the possibility of a collection alternative in a CDP hearing.

This order decides respondent’s motion for summary judgment to which petitioner’s counsel had an opportunity to respond, but did not.

Petitioner had requested an extension to file the tax returns for the years at issue, but never actually filed so the IRS prepared substitute for returns and assessed the balances, interest and penalties. The petitioner did not make any payments and eventually received a notice of intent to levy. Petitioner’s counsel requested a CDP hearing stating that petitioner could not pay the balance and that health issues had caused the petitioner to cash out his savings and retirement.

As usual in these types of cases, the settlement officer requested a collection financial statement. The settlement officer also requested a 2015 tax return and proof that petitioner had made estimated tax payments for the current year. Petitioner’s counsel filed the 2015 return but did not have a financial statement completed by the hearing date and requested more time which the settlement officer granted. The extended deadline date came, and petitioner’s counsel still did not have the financial statement completed, so he requested yet another extension. The settlement officer denied the request for a second extension and instead directed petitioner’s counsel to contact the collection unit once he had the information. Then the settlement officer issued a notice of determination sustaining the proposed levy.

It is not clear if the reason petitioner’s counsel was unable to comply with deadlines was due to the petitioner not supplying counsel with information in a timely manner, however, the Court reprimanded petitioner’s counsel by stating, “[Petitioner’s counsel], as an attorney, understands the importance of filing due dates and has a professional responsibility to exercise due diligence.”

The Court also pointed out that the Appeals Office will attempt to conduct a CDP hearing “as expeditiously as possible under the circumstances” but there is no time frame mandating when the Appeals Office must issue a notice of determination nor is there a time frame for when they must keep a case open despite not receiving requested information.

The Court finds the settlement officer did not abuse her discretion by not allowing a second extension for the financial statement, because she is not required to give extensions. The settlement officer was ultimately unable to determine an appropriate collection alternative due to the lack of information, which is also not an abuse of discretion, so the Court grants respondent’s motion for summary judgment.

No Jurisdiction Over Petitioner’s Requests

Docket No. 9661-16, Pankaj Mercia v. C.I.R. (Order here)

In this designated order the Court has already entered a stipulated decision, but the petitioner files a motion which the Court treats as a motion to revise pursuant to rule 162.

The Court denies the petitioner’s motion to revise. The case is a deficiency case concerning 2009, 2010, and 2011, but the petitioner’s motion requests relief for earlier years, later years and for collection-related issues. The petitioner also requested relief from credit reporting agencies. The Court does not have the authority to assist the petitioner with nearly all the issues he raised.

The one issue the Court may be able to address is petitioner’s allegation that the IRS assessed more tax than what the Court had determined he owed at the end of his Tax Court case. The Court can review claims of excessive interest, but that type of claim is not raised by the petitioner. The Court amount assessed is correct and consists of the amount decided in Tax Court plus the amount petitioner self-reported when he filed his tax return.

This is another good example of the Court trying to understand a pro se petitioner’s arguments and assist him through the process, while also being bound by subject matter jurisdiction.

Designated Orders: 1/22/18 to 1/26/18 by William Schmidt

In continuing the theme of light weeks for designated orders from the Tax Court, there were 2 orders this week.

The first, Charles Asong-Morfaw v. Commissioner, is a denial of petitioner’s motion for reconsideration of a denial of deductions for his vehicle. Since the Court did not believe he used it exclusively for business, he was only allowed to deduct mileage.

The second order, Cecil K. Kyei v. Commissioner, is from a Tax Court case filed in 2012 that has been delayed due to multiple stays from the petitioner’s bankruptcy proceedings. The parties came to a settlement, prompting the Court to enter a decision. After entry of the decision, the Court learned that the automatic stay of B.C. 362(a)(8) deprived the Court of jurisdiction. The existence of the automatic stay required the Court to vacate that decision. This situation happens occasionally when a taxpayer files a petition while the automatic stay is still in existence (which deprives the Tax Court of jurisdiction over the case) or, as here, files a bankruptcy case while the Tax Court case was pending (which stops the Tax Court from taking any action on the case until the stay is lifted.) Once the stay was lifted, the IRS filed a motion for entry of decision on January 12, 2018, but based it on that previously vacated decision. The judge did not realize the motion was based on the vacated decision and had ordered that arguments on the motion would be heard on January 22, 2018. The petitioner did not appear and respondent renewed his motion for entry of decision, with the judge stating he expected to grant the motion.

At the time of this current order, the judge noted the omission and the motion’s reliance on the alleged agreement entered into during the automatic stay. The judge then ordered that the motion is denied without prejudice unless there is a complete motion that addresses how the agreement was not void by virtue of the automatic stay. Each of the parties are to make a filing as to their recommendation for further proceedings no later than February 16.

Non-Designated Orders

Since there is a low showing of designated orders, I am going to turn to two non-designated orders brought to the attention of the Procedurally Taxing brain trust by Bob Kamman (the titles are his also).

  • Don’t Show Up For Trial; Win Graev Penalty Issue Anyway

Docket # 6993-17S, Clay Robert Kugler v. Commissioner (Order of Dismissal and Decision Here).

Petitioner did not appear for trial in Fresno on December 11, 2017. The Court directed the IRS to file a supplement to their motion to dismiss, showing that it is appropriate to impose a penalty under IRC section 6662(a) in that case. On January 18, 2018, the IRS filed their supplement, stating they concede the petitioner is not liable for the penalty. Petitioner failed to respond to respondent’s motion. The order decides that petitioner is not liable for the accuracy related penalty under IRC section 6662(a) for tax year 2014.

Despite the fact that the petitioner did not show up for trial and did not respond to respondent’s motion, the Tax Court’s focus on Graev led to the removal of a 6662(a) accuracy related penalty!

  • Oops!

Docket # [Redacted for Reasons Cited Below].

One Tax Court order last week had an attached copy of the petition, with the statement of taxpayer identification number included, potentially revealing social security numbers for the petitioners to others in the world with internet access. The Court immediately corrected the order when the problem was brought to their attention. Just like all of us the Court occasionally makes mistakes. Sometimes it is worth double checking the electronic footprint of your case to make sure what goes up is what you intended to go up. We mention this case to set the scene for the following practitioner’s tips.

Takeaways:

  • The statement of taxpayer identification number is regularly used by the Tax Court to keep a record of the social security number of the petitioner(s). It is not scanned and uploaded as part of the public file accessible by others. Quickly alert the Court in the unusual event this document is mistakenly scanned and made a part of the public record.
  • Before sending documents to the Court make sure to review the every document submitted to the Tax Court as part of the petition package. Carefully review the notice of deficiency or other IRS documents in order to redact the social security number of the petitioner(s).
  • Check all of the numbers on the IRS correspondence thoroughly before sending to Tax Court. Innocent-looking barcodes that have a sequence of numbers beneath them can contain a petitioner’s social security number. It is worth comparing the social security numbers of the petitioners to all of the number sequences in order to make sure the redacting is complete.
  • If your client files a bankruptcy petition while a Tax Court case is pending, alert the Court immediately. The Court will then issue an order placing the case in suspense and order the parties to file periodic status reports alerting the Court to the lifting of the stay so that the case could once again move forward.

 

 

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