Designated Orders: 2/19/18 to 2/23/18

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This week’s designated order post was prepared by William Schmidt of Kansas Legal Aid Services. Of course, one of the designated orders addresses an issue of interpretation of the Graev case. This week the Court struggles with the concession of the fraud penalty for lack of proper approval and the impact of that concession on the statute of limitations. If the IRS does not obtain the proper approval for imposition of the fraud penalty and if the statute of limitations expires but for the exception provided by proof of fraud, there can be situations in which the IRS must prove fraud for purposes of holding open the statute but not be allowed to impose the fraud penalty for lack of approval.

The second case discussed by William concerns a bankruptcy issue I have never seen litigated and one it appears the IRS did not appreciate the Court was asking about. The issue concerns the scope of the automatic stay. Section 362(a)(8) of the Bankruptcy Code imposes a stay “on the commencement or continuation of a proceeding before the United States Tax Court concerning a tax liability of a debtor … who is an individual for a taxable period ending before the date of the order for relief under this title.” The IRS and the taxpayer negotiated a settlement with the debtor during a period in which the stay was in effect. They submitted a decision document to the Court which was signed by the Court and then set aside when the existence of the stay became known to the IRS and the Court. After the lifting of the stay, the IRS resubmitted the decision document. The Court questions the binding effect of a settlement negotiated during the stay and finds a work around. Keith

One pattern for Tax Court is that holiday weeks are light weeks for designated orders. There were 3 designated orders this particular week.

The first, Renee Vento, et al., v. Commissioner (3 consolidated cases), finds the petitioners trying to claim deductions for payments made to the Virgin Islands Bureau of Internal Revenue (VIBIR). They now concede they are cash method taxpayers so would not be eligible to claim deductions on 2001 U.S. tax liability for 2002 payments made to the VIBIR.

Followup on Mr. Kyei

The second order, Cecil K. Kyei v. Commissioner, updates a previous designated order report here. To summarize, Mr. Kyei has filed for bankruptcy previously and those time periods have overlapped with his Tax Court cases. Specifically, a previous settlement agreement with the IRS looks to be void because it was during the time period of an automatic stay based on a bankruptcy filing. The parties were to file their recommendations before February 16.

Mr. Kyei has been nonresponsive and the IRS is unable to contact him. The IRS filed their recommendation to proceed with the notices of deficiency for 2008 and 2010, but accept a lower amount for 2009.

The Court’s decision is that the June 2015 agreement is not enforceable because of the automatic stay. The Court denied the IRS motion for entry of decision based on the agreement. The Court is treating the IRS motion, while not styled as a motion for dismissal, as a motion to dismiss for lack of prosecution.

The IRS did not address the 2010 penalty of $2,614.80 so they are ordered to file a supplement to their motion addressing the burden of production for the 2010 penalty no later than March 9, 2018. Mr. Kyei shall file his response to the motion as supplemented no later than March 23, 2018.

Takeaway: Potentially Mr. Kyei had a good settlement agreement in place with the IRS in June 2015. The bankruptcy affecting that time period means that the automatic stay interfered with those settlement negotiations and they are no longer enforceable. Now that the IRS is unable to contact him, Mr. Kyei is likely going to owe once again the original notice of deficiency amounts (with a lower amount in 2009), making part of his actions in vain.

Further Graev Fallout

The third order, Johannes Lamprecht & Linda Lamprecht v. Commissioner, further deals with Graev penalties. On February 20, 2018, the IRS filed a status report conceding the requirements of 6751(b)(1) were not met regarding the 6663 fraud penalty for 2006 and 2007. They indicate they are prepared to introduce evidence on compliance with 6751(b)(1) in connection with the 6662 accuracy-related penalty but trial is no longer required as to the fraud penalty. The status report does not comment on the issue of fraud as it relates to the statute of limitations.

The Court’s order is to strike the case from the March 8, 2018, Washington, D.C. Special Session calendar. No later than March 9, 2018, the IRS shall file a status report regarding their position as to the statute of limitations and the arguments relied on to show the statute of limitations does not bar the assessment of the accuracy-related penalty still at issue. The report should explain whether intending to argue fraud for the purpose of 6501(c)(1). If the concession affects the relevance of the information sought in the motions to compel, then that date is a deadline for amended motions to bring the previous motions into conformity with their current position. It is further ordered that the parties shall file a status report no later than March 23, 2018, (or separate reports, if necessary) with their recommendations as to further case proceedings (including a deadline for petitioners’ response to the motions to compel).

Takeaway Summary: There looks to be some IRS give-and-take regarding the 6751(b)(1) penalty in this case regarding Graev fallout. While conceding the 6663 fraud penalty, the IRS has not given up on the 6662 accuracy-related penalty and the Court wants explanation of how the statute of limitations allows them to proceed on that accuracy-related penalty. It is curious how each case develops regarding 6751(b)(1) penalties.

 

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