Designated Orders: 3/19/18 to 3/23/18

0 Flares Filament.io 0 Flares ×

Guest blogger William Schmidt from Legal Services of Kansas brings us the designated order post from two weeks ago as we catch up on this feature. The Tax Court designated a high number of order during this week including a couple concerning an individual on whom we have posted previously with respect to the frivolous return penalty. The Kestin case demonstrates the lengths to which the Court goes to try to protect pro se petitioners and assist them in understanding the process. Keith

For the week of March 19 to 23, there were 10 designated orders from the Tax Court. The first order lifted temporary seals and denied petitioner’s motion for protective order in order to seal public records (order here). In the second, petitioner’s protests, including that parts of Pennsylvania were declared a federal disaster area, were in vain (order here). The third order details fallout from the Affordable Care Act – how a woman’s marriage took her over income for the premium tax credit and thus she had to repay it (order and decision here).

Miscellaneous Short Items

  • Numbered Paragraphs from IRS – Docket No. 18254-17 L, Gwendolyn L. Kestin v. C.I.R. (Order here). In this order, the IRS filed a motion for summary judgment with a supporting memorandum that has a 9-page statement of facts consisting of unnumbered paragraphs. To assist the unrepresented petitioner, the Tax Court ordered the IRS to supplement the motion with a statement of facts with numbered paragraphs. The Court instructed Ms. Kestin on responding to the IRS motion for summary judgment and attached a copy of the Tax Court webite’s Q&A on “What is a summary judgment? How should I respond to one?”
  • Three Year Time Limit – Docket No. 23113-12, Frank W. Dollarhide & Michelle D. Dollarhide v. C.I.R. (Order and Decision here). This order is an illustration of the 3-year limitation on refunds. While the Dollarhides addressed their tax liability when they filed their 2006 tax return in 2011, they were outside the three-year time limit to receive the tax refund they would have been due had they filed a timely tax return.
read more...

Correct Petition Filing Brings Tax Court Jurisdiction

  • Docket No. 380-18, John Henry Ryskamp v. C.I.R. (Order of Dismissal for Lack of Jurisdiction here). Mr. Ryskamp’s 2018 case is dismissed because he filed the petition based on an IRS Letter 2802C where the petitioner wrote “Notice of Determination” rather than an official IRS Notice of Determination. Mr. Ryskamp cites his own 2015 case before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to no avail. In fact, the Court notes his 2016 case (7383-16) was also a petition based on a Letter 2802C. While referencing the ability to penalize him a penalty up to $25,000, the Court does not impose a penalty but warns that the Court will strongly consider imposing a penalty if he returns with similar arguments.
  • Docket No. 23808-17 L, John Henry Ryskamp v. C.I.R. (Order and Order of Dismissal for Lack of Jurisdiction here). In the same week, there is a designated order for Mr. Ryskamp’s 2017 Tax Court case. In the background, the Court elaborates on the 2015 case before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which was an affirmation of a 2011 Tax Court order and decision which granted summary judgment for the IRS on a notice of deficiency for tax years 2003 to 2006, 2008, and 2009. By the way, Mr. Ryskamp’s petition for writ of certiorari was denied by the U.S. Supreme Court, making the Tax Court decision in that matter final. For this case, Mr. Ryskamp filed a petition based off a Letter 4473C again concerning the 2003 tax year. Since the petition was not based off a proper notice of deficiency, the Court granted the IRS motion to dismiss for lack of jurisdiction. This time, there was no mention of a penalty for the litigious Mr. Ryskamp.
  • Docket No. 9417-17, Fletcher Hyler v. C.I.R. (Order of Dismissal for Lack of Jurisdiction here). In a similar vein, this designated order tells how petitioner filed a petition based on a math error notice for 2015. Since it was not based off a notice of deficiency, the Court granted the IRS motion to dismiss for lack of jurisdiction.

Takeaway: It is necessary for a petitioner to file the petition based off a valid notice of deficiency or based on another valid issue. A petitioner cannot pick a random mailing from the IRS and file a petition with Tax Court. When a petitioner does, the Tax Court will not have jurisdiction and shall have to dismiss the case (with potential penalties for petitioners like Mr. Ryskamp).

Social Security Hardship for Petitioner

Docket No. 16269-16SL, Bonnie Lou Black v. C.I.R. (Order and Decision here).

In this case, the procedural issues are straightforward. Ms. Black sought review of a notice of intent to levy for her 2012 tax deficiency. Ms. Black did not submit financial information, offer any collection alternatives or agree to a payment plan. Since that was the case, the Tax Court granted the IRS motion for summary judgment.

An issue in the case, though, is that the IRS issued an erroneous CP-22A balance due notice for 2011 stating that $8,384.18 was due to them. The next month, the IRS corrected the error by issuing a CP-21C notice stating there was no balance due for 2011.

Ms. Black stated that the Social Security Administration reduced her benefits based on this IRS error. Since the government agencies share income information, she believes that the Social Security Administration thought she had increased income in 2011 and reduced her benefits. She requested relief in Tax Court but they note in this order’s second footnote they were unable to assist her because they “do not have jurisdiction to determine Social Security benefits, just tax deficiencies.”

Takeaway: IRS actions can affect taxpayers in a variety of ways, sometimes for the worse. It may be necessary to find creative ways to find clients relief. Unfortunately for Ms. Black, Tax Court is not the answer for assisting with her Social Security issues. Hopefully she can find help elsewhere.

How Long Does Petitioner Need to Prepare for Trial?

Docket No. 23475-15, William Budell Markolf v. C.I.R. (Order here).

This case is based on tax liabilities for 2008 through 2011. The IRS issued a notice of deficiency June 16, 2015 and petitioner filed with Tax Court September 15, 2015. The case was set for trial in Columbia, South Carolina, beginning October 17, 2016, with a pretrial order issued May 16, 2016 with a standard notice to exchange trial documents no later than two weeks before the trial session. On September 26, 2016, petitioner’s counsel filed a motion for continuance, explaining the need for additional time to secure documents, estimating three weeks would be necessary (which would be October 17, 2016). Petitioner was to file a supplement describing work toward preparation, which was filed October 3, 2016.

By notice filed April 11, 2017, the trial was rescheduled in Columbia for the session beginning September 11, 2017 with a new pretrial order. On August 8, 2017, respondent mailed a 65 paragraph stipulation of facts and 49 exhibits planned for trial. While there were several phone conferences the Court held, petitioner’s counsel did not respond to respondent’s stipulation or submit exhibits, which were not prepared as of a week before trial.

Then Hurricane Irma was expected to arrive in Columbia, South Carolina on September 11, 2017, prompting the Court to continue the case. The order stated that petitioner had “the unintended consequence” of continuance and he was given more time “which we think he does not deserve.” The court stressed he should not delay and should “complete that work while the iron is hot,” stating he should expect no further continuance or latitude regarding the pretrial order.

On September 15, 2017, respondent sent petitioner two copies of a revised stipulation of facts (now 73 paragraphs) and 49 exhibits. In correspondence sent in September, November, December, and January, respondent requested petitioner to sign and return the revised stipulation, but that did not happen.

By notice December 4, 2017, the Court set the trial in Columbia for April 30, 2018 with the standard pretrial order. On February 21, 2018, the IRS filed a motion for an order to show cause. On February 23, the Court held a phone conference where petitioner’s counsel stated petitioner hired an independent contractor to assist with document preparation and cited a difficulty was petitioner’s recent surgery. The Court granted the motion by ordering that petitioner had to document on or before March 15, 2018, why the IRS stipulation and exhibits should not be deemed admitted for the case.

On March 2, the IRS filed a motion to compel production of documents, which the Court granted in part on March 7, 2018. On March 16, petitioner filed a one-page answer twice with two different cover sheets, one being “Petitioner’s Response to Motion to Compel Production of Documents” and the other “Petitioner’s Reply to Answer.” Despite the second title, the document does not refer to the order to show cause or the motion it granted. It also does not refer by number to the stipulation or to any exhibits. Two documents are attached to the memoranda that are not sworn affidavits or signed under penalty of perjury.   One is a purported letter from a physician stating petitioner had surgery on December 6, 2017, and was “released to full-time work” on January 7, 2018. The other details the medical issues of the accountant hired to assist the petitioner. From January through March 2018, the accountant had the flu for two weeks, broke his right ankle, had surgery February 12, and was in physical rehabilitation from February 15 until discharged March 8, returning to work for petitioner on March 13. The accountant cites those issues as reasons for delay in assisting petitioner with the trial document preparation.

The Court reviews these delays, citing that the case was filed 2 and a half years ago and involves tax returns due 6 or more years ago. The petitioner received 2 continuances with admonishments not to delay further the production of documents. The Court notes that the petitioner waited until December to hire an assistant for the document production and not times such as when the returns were prepared, when the IRS examined them, when he received the notice of deficiency, filed the petition, received the first notice of trial with standing pretrial order, the time of the second notice, or when warned there would be no further continuances granted. The Court notes that allowing for the difficulties arising in recent months, those were “long after petitioner’s work on this case should have been largely finished.” The late-occurring mishaps do not explain why petitioner did not cooperate in the stipulation process and did not make an actual response to the order to show cause. The Court ordered that the Order to Show Cause is made absolute and respondent’s proposed stipulation is deemed stipulated for purposes of the pending case.

Takeaway: This case is an illustration on what not to do for a pending Tax Court trial. Basically, read the pretrial order and follow its instructions. Respond to opposing counsel’s stipulations and exhibits. As you need to, provide your own stipulations and exhibits on time. When the judge says to do any of those tasks and that there will be no more continuances, take that seriously and respond accordingly.

 

 

Comments

  1. In the Hyder case, it appears that the only thing the taxpayer did right (well, not really, but sort of) was to file a petition based on a math error notice. At least it got IRS’s attention. His problem is that he then tried to piggyback earlier years that were in collection and likewise not eligible for Tax Court review. From the order:

    “On May 1, 2017, petitioner filed a petition with the Court and attached thereto a mathematical error notice for the taxable year 2015. In subsequent filings with the Court, petitioner suggested that the years in dispute include the taxable years 2009 and 2010–attaching various collection notices concerning those years to documents that he has filed with the Court. . . .

    “A. 2015
    “Respondent informed the Court that he will treat the petition filed in this case on May 1, 2017, as a timely request for abatement in respect of the mathematical error notice for 2015, dated April 10, 2017, attached to the petition.

    “Consequently, consistent with the provisions of section 6213(b)(2)(A), respondent will abate all assessments related to that notice and any reassessment shall be subject to the deficiency procedures prescribed in that section. The record otherwise reflects that, as of May 1, 2017, respondent had not issued to petitioner any notice of deficiency or notice of determination that would permit him to invoke the Court’s jurisdiction for the taxable year 2015.”

    Since this is the time of year when most “math error notices” are issued, it may be helpful to review the procedures for disputing them under Section 6213. Keep in mind that many math error notices do not really involve math errors.

    Section 6213(b):

    (b) Exceptions to restrictions on assessment
    (1) Assessments arising out of mathematical or clerical errors
    If the taxpayer is notified that, on account of a mathematical or clerical error appearing on the return, an amount of tax in excess of that shown on the return is due, and that an assessment of the tax has been or will be made on the basis of what would have been the correct amount of tax but for the mathematical or clerical error, such notice shall not be considered as a notice of deficiency for the purposes of subsection (a) (prohibiting assessment and collection until notice of the deficiency has been mailed), or of section 6212(c)(1) (restricting further deficiency letters), or of section 6512(a) (prohibiting credits or refunds after petition to the Tax Court), and the taxpayer shall have no right to file a petition with the Tax Court based on such notice, nor shall such assessment or collection be prohibited by the provisions of subsection (a) of this section. Each notice under this paragraph shall set forth the error alleged and an explanation thereof.

    (2) Abatement of assessment of mathematical or clerical errors
    (A) Request for abatement
    Notwithstanding section 6404(b), a taxpayer may file with the Secretary within 60 days after notice is sent under paragraph (1) a request for an abatement of any assessment specified in such notice, and upon receipt of such request, the Secretary shall abate the assessment. Any reassessment of the tax with respect to which an abatement is made under this subparagraph shall be subject to the deficiency procedures prescribed by this subchapter.

    (B) Stay of collection
    In the case of any assessment referred to in paragraph (1), notwithstanding paragraph (1), no levy or proceeding in court for the collection of such assessment shall be made, begun, or prosecuted during the period in which such assessment may be abated under this paragraph.

  2. Hyler, not Hyder

  3. Norman Diamond says:

    “A petitioner cannot pick a random mailing from the IRS and file a petition with Tax Court. When a petitioner does, the Tax Court will not have jurisdiction and shall have to dismiss the case”

    The big question is how a taxpayer can figure out whether the IRS mailing is one that establishes a deadline where the taxpayer must petition the Tax Court or one that doesn’t let the taxpayer petition the Tax Court. Did Craig, 119 T.C. No. 15 (USTC 2002), make a lucky guess or did he somehow know?

    Also consider Atuke, docket 31680-15SL (USTC 2016). In order to have a chance of obtaining jurisdiction, the taxpayer needed to file without waiting to receive a Notice of Determination, without knowing if the IRS had mailed one or not during each 30 day period. Unfortunately he waited for the notice.

Comment Policy: While we all have years of experience as practitioners and attorneys, and while Keith and Les have taught for many years, we think our work is better when we generate input from others. That is one of the reasons we solicit guest posts (and also because of the time it takes to write what we think are high quality posts). Involvement from others makes our site better. That is why we have kept our site open to comments.

If you want to make a public comment, you must identify yourself (using your first and last name) and register by including your email. If you do not, we will remove your comment. In a comment, if you disagree with or intend to criticize someone (such as the poster, another commenter, a party or counsel in a case), you must do so in a respectful manner. We reserve the right to delete comments. If your comment is obnoxious, mean-spirited or violates our sense of decency we will remove the comment. While you have the right to say what you want, you do not have the right to say what you want on our blog.

Speak Your Mind

*