JOB POSTING: CLINICAL FELLOW, FEDERAL TAX CLINIC AT HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

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The tax clinic at Harvard has had a great clinical fellow this year, Caleb Smith.  Caleb is leaving Harvard to become the director of the clinic at University of Minnesota, a wonderful opportunity for him to direct one of the oldest and best tax clinics in the country.  Congratulations to occasional guest blogger Caleb Smith and continued success in the future.

I am using this space to post the announcement that the tax clinic at Harvard is seeking to find someone to replace Caleb.  The announcement is for a two year position although it has the possibility of reappointment at the end of that period.  Please contact Caleb (casmith@law.harvard.edu) if you want to know more about what the position entails or just want to congratulate him or contact me (kfogg@law.harvard.edu).  I plan to continue working in the Harvard clinic moving forward and am excited that Harvard is committing the resources to hire a full-time fellow with long term prospects.

The announcement contains a link to the Harvard’s human resources office but you can also use this link to get directly to the announcement.  The announcement also has a link to the web site of the Legal Services Center.  The other clinics and other clinicians at the Center make it a great environment in which to work.  Keith

Position Available:  The Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School (LSC) seeks to hire a Clinical Fellow in the Federal Tax Clinic.  The Clinic—through which Harvard Law students receive hands-on lawyering opportunities—provides direct legal representation in tax controversies to low-income taxpayers. The Clinic’s docket includes cases before the IRS, in Federal Tax Court, and in the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeal.  Many of the Clinic’s cases raise cutting-edge issues regarding tax procedure and tax law.  The Fellow’s responsibilities will include screening cases for merit and law reform opportunities, representing clients, helping to manage the Clinic’s docket, contributing to community outreach and engagement efforts, and supporting the Clinic’s teaching mission. The Fellow will work closely with Clinical Professor Keith Fogg, who directs the Clinic.  The position represents a unique opportunity to join Harvard Law School’s clinical program, to work in a dynamic public interest and clinical teaching law office, and to develop lawyering and clinical teaching skills.  Salary is commensurate with experience.  The position is for an initial two-year appointment.  The possibility of reappointment depends on the availability of funding and Law School and project requirements.

Minimum Requirements: Candidates must have received a J.D. within the last three (3) years or expect to receive a J.D. in spring 2017.  Candidates must already be admitted to a state bar or be able to sit for a state bar exam in summer 2017 with the expectation of admission to a state bar in fall 2017.  Massachusetts bar admission is not required.  The successful candidate will have experience in tax law, whether clinical, pro bono, government, or private practice, and a demonstrated commitment to the needs of low-income taxpayers.

To Apply:  Applications must be submitted via Harvard’s Human Resources website.  Applicants should apply for the position designated as Clinical Fellow, Harvard Law School (ID #42289BR).   

About the Legal Services Center:  Located at the crossroads of Jamaica Plain and Roxbury in the City of Boston, we are a community-based clinical law program of Harvard Law School. Through five clinical offerings—Family Law/Domestic Violence Clinic, Predatory Lending/Consumer Protection Clinic, Housing Clinic, Veterans Legal Clinic, and Federal Tax Clinic—and numerous pro bono initiatives we provide essential legal services to low-income residents of Greater Boston and in some instances, where cases present important law reform opportunities, to clients outside our service area. Our longstanding mission is to educate law students for practice and professional service while simultaneously meeting the critical needs of the community. Since 1979, we have engaged in cutting-edge litigation and legal strategies to improve the lives of individual clients, to seek systemic change for the communities we serve, and to provide law students with a singular opportunity to develop fundamental lawyering skills within a public interest law setting. To these ends, we actively partner with a diverse array of organizations, including healthcare and social service providers and advocacy groups, and continually adapt our practice areas to meet the changing legal needs of our client communities. We encourage diversity, value unique voices, and pursue with passion our twin goals of teaching law students and advocating for clients. To learn more, please visit the LSC website.

 

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