FOIA Lawsuit for Information Gathered from Tax Practitioners

Today we welcome guest blogger Nick Xanthopoulos.  Nick was a staff attorney at Nevada Legal Services’ Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) from December 2014 until October 2016, and a staff attorney at Mid-Minnesota Legal Aid’s LITC from November 2016 until July 2019.  From August 2019 until November 2019, Nick was an attorney at Kennedy Law Offices, P.A., a boutique law firm in Eagan, Minnesota that represents clients in tax, business, and estate related legal matters.  Nick is currently on sabbatical. Tuan Samahon, a colleague of mine from Villanova, and Shawn Rodgers, both of whom specialize in FOIA litigation at Goldstein LP, will be handling the case. (Their pro hac vice motions are pending). Keith

Before 2018, tax professionals with an IRS power of attorney (Form 2848) on file went through a familiar process when calling the IRS to represent someone: we provided the taxpayer’s Social Security number (SSN) and name, our name and Centralized Authorization File (CAF) number (a unique identifier), and which tax years and forms we were authorized to discuss.  During these calls we were often asked additional information about the taxpayer to verify the taxpayer’s address or phone number but not personal information about ourselves.  Indeed, the Internal Revenue Manual (IRM), a guide that IRS employees are supposed to follow, says that only those items are needed to verify that a caller is an authorized third party.  (IRM 21.1.3.3(2).)

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In January 2018, the IRS changed the procedure with no advance notice, and obviously, no opportunity for comment by the affected parties.  Since then, IRS employees begin nearly every phone call by forcing practitioners to say our own SSN, date of birth, and other personal information.  In gathering this information, the IRS should take responsibility for the protection of this information under Internal Revenue Code (IRC) section 6103 but also allow practitioners to know how it uses and protects that information.  If we refuse to state our confidential information during the recorded phone call, IRS will not let us represent our clients, thereby worsening an access to justice gap.  If we do answer the questions about our personal information, it becomes part of the client’s file.  I know that the IRS records calls and keeps them in taxpayers’ files because I have secured at least 4 such recordings through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.  In at least 2 of them, an IRS employee insisted on me stating my SSN despite knowing that my client was listening.

I have had several clients who were victims of tax-related identify theft.  ID theft damage can only be mitigated, never fixed.  Yet no IRS employee has ever instilled me with any confidence that the IRS would redact my SSN from all recordings and all case notes.  As a result, I have refused to state my SSN during any call when I was representing a client.  Practitioners should never be forced to choose between representing someone as effectively as possible and protecting ourselves from identity theft or other misuse of our own personal information.  If the IRS published the procedures it follows to ensure practitioners’ information is kept separate from clients’ files, then practitioners could make an informed decision about whether it is safe to state our SSNs in order to represent our clients.

In June 2019, Professor Keith Fogg and I made a FOIA request for “IRS agency records relating to precautions taken to safeguard the confidentiality of return and return information taken by the IRS from tax practitioners.”  In response, the IRS directed us to the www.irs.gov version of IRM 21.1.3.3, which is heavily redacted, and provided no other agency records.  In explaining why it redacted much of IRM 21.1.3.3, the IRS claimed the “records or information [was] compiled for law enforcement purposes” and that release “would disclose techniques and procedures for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions or would disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions if such disclosure could reasonably be expected to risk circumvention of the law.” When Professor Fogg and I administratively appealed the partial denial of our FOIA request, the IRS Independent Office of Appeals summarily upheld the IRS decision.

As a result, Professor Fogg and I sued the IRS. We filed a complaint on November 29, 2019, in US District Court in the District of Minnesota seeking production of the requested records.  The IRS claims that the new authentication procedure’s “intent is to enhance protections for tax professionals and their clients.”  (IRM 21.1.3.3(3).)  The public and tax practitioners should have the right to see agency records about how the IRS is protecting tax professionals when the IRS forces professionals to state their own confidential information in order to represent a taxpayer.

The treatment of the information of professionals seeking to represent taxpayers should not be the type of information that the IRS hides from the professionals to protect law enforcement.  These professionals are not the taxpayers in the case and are seeking only to represent the taxpayers.  To hide from them the uses of the information and the safeguards surrounding the information denies them the opportunity to make an informed decision.  This is particularly important when the IRS has adopted a procedure without notice and comment and without input from the affected community.

Tax professionals provide an important service to the tax system.  They should not be treated as criminals entitled to no voice in what personal information is elicited from them nor have the use of the information hidden from them. Of course, the IRS has an important job in making sure that it only provides a taxpayer’s information to a properly authorized representative. That aspect of its mission, however, does not give it carte blanche to gather and use all manner of information from the professionals who practice before it, especially without giving those professionals a voice in what information is gathered, the safeguards placed on that information and the uses of that information.

The goal of the FOIA litigation is to find out answers to these questions so that the practitioner community can begin to have a voice in how its information is used by the IRS and protected from abuse.  Please take a moment to learn more about this important issue by reading the FOIA complaint.  You can access the complaint (including exhibits) for free here, thanks to Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC).

FOIA Suit Seeking Trump’s Returns Fails

Over the past two plus years we have written four posts about Mr. Trump’s returns here, here, here and here. A good argument could be made that this is four posts too many; however, the recent decision of the DC Circuit in a FOIA case seeking those returns brought by the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) provides an opportunity to go beyond speculation about obtaining those returns and focus on how, in the interaction between FOIA and IRC 6103, the law does not permit third parties to use FOIA as a means of obtaining the returns or return information of others. In the course of ruling on this case the DC Circuit sets the IRS straight on the appropriate standard to apply to those making a FOIA request.

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Shortly after the 2016 election EPIC submitted a FOIA request to the IRS seeking the tax returns of Donald Trump for the years 2010 and forward. It also sought “any other indications of financial relations with the Russian government or Russian businesses.” Not surprisingly, the IRS declined to comply with the request. In declining the IRS provided two reasons: 1) the requested “documents, to the extent that any exists, consist of, or contain the tax returns or return information of a third party,” which “may not be disclosed unless specifically authorized by law” and 2) the IRS rules require consent of the third party when a request is made for their tax return. Because the IRS rules require the consent of the third party when a return is requested, the IRS did not even process the FOIA request.

EPIC submitted a second request trying a slightly different tack by citing to IRC 6103(k)(3). This provision allows the IRS to disclose return information to correct a misstatement of fact if correcting the misstatement is necessary to a tax administration purpose. This provision also requires that the IRS obtain the approval of the Joint Committee on Taxation before making a disclosure. The IRS responded to EPIC’s second request by notifying it that the second request also did not cite a basis for turning over to it the returns of President Trump. The IRS concluded this letter by notifying EPIC that it would not process any further requests from it on this topic.

EPIC brought suit seeking relief under both FOIA and the Administrative Procedure Act. The district court dismissed the suit and the DC Circuit affirmed the dismissal but in doing so provided some clarity regarding the reason for denying the request. The circuit court explained the interplay between FOIA and the IRC. It provided an explanation for how and when tax records stand outside the type of government record that can be obtained through a FOIA request. It noted, however, that the district court denied the request for failure to exhaust administrative remedies. That basis for dismissal was wrong but even though it was wrong other reasons for dismissing the case existed making the decision to deny the requested relief correct.

The court points out that this is not an ordinary exhaustion of remedies case where the litigant rushes to court without giving the agency the chance to consider the argument. Here, EPIC tried to get the IRS’ attention and got pushed away. The IRS argues that because EPIC’s request violated its published rules for considering a FOIA request by not obtaining President Trump’s permission to seek his tax returns EPIC did not exhaust the available administrative remedies. This is an interesting interpretation of the exhaustion doctrine which views the requester’s failure to do the impossible, obtain permission from a party who does not want to consent, as a failure to exhaust remedies.

According to the DC Circuit, the IRS “misunderstands its FOIA disclosure obligations. FOIA unambiguously places on an agency the burden of establishing that records are exempt.” To prevail, the IRS cannot rely on a perceived failure by the requester but must show that the information sought is subject to the IRC 6103(a) bar on disclosure. Although the Court agrees with the IRS that it can create published rules regarding the procedures to follow in making a request, the Court disagrees with the IRS that those rules can substantively shift the burden from the agency to the requester regarding the basis for denying the request. Here, “[n]one of the purposes of exhaustion supports barring judicial review of EPIC’s claims.” Still, the IRS has the ability to show that EPIC should not receive the requested documents by making a showing on the merits of the applicable statutes – which it does.

The scope of IRC 6103 in protecting taxpayer records is broad but is still limited in scope. The court notes that “[n]ot all IRS records constitute tax returns or return information.” It cites as an example of material not covered by those definitions the legal analysis contained in IRS Field Service Advice Memoranda. Here, the first part of EPIC’s request, the request for President Trump’s tax returns, clearly falls within the scope of tax returns and return information and “is plainly covered by section 6103(a)’s bar.”

With respect to the requested information concerning financial relations with Russia, the court finds that the request is framed in such a way that answering it reveals the fact that tax returns were filed, making any response one which would disclose tax returns or return information. Therefore, the court denies this request as well.

Moving on to EPIC’s revised request citing to 6103(k)(3), the court finds that this provision was not designed as a provision for parties to make a request to the IRS but rather for the IRS to make a decision to disclose information to avoid problems with tax administration. The court finds “Congress’s omission of any public right to ‘request’ disclosure under section 6103(k)(3) is intentional.” So, this provision affords the requestor no disclosure right. EPIC’s claim based on this provision fails.

Lastly, the court looks at the APA as a basis to disclose the returns. It finds that the APA claim should be dismissed because FOIA, not the APA, provides the basis for the remedy sought by the requestor. The fact that FOIA does not allow disclosure under this circumstance does not mean that the APA provides a separate remedy.

No doubt we have not heard the last of attempts to obtain President Trump’s returns. The harder people try to obtain the returns without success, the more respect I have for the IRS and the states in their administration of the disclosure laws. Maybe one day we will see the returns and learn great secrets. In the meantime we should appreciate that the disclosure laws which were tightened significantly in response to President Nixon’s attempts to misuse the IRS seem to be working well.

 

 

Professor Kwoka Sues IRS and Explains the Path of FOIA in Two Recent Important Law Review Articles

Kwoka v IRS is a FOIA case from a federal district court in the District of Columbia. The case involves Professor Margaret Kwoka, one of the leading scholars of government secrecy in general and FOIA in particular. In the lawsuit, Professor Kowka is seeking records that categorize FOIA requests IRS received in 2015, including the names and organizational affiliations of third-party requesters and the organizational affiliation of first-party requesters. The IRS provided some of the information she sought, but not all of it.

In this post I will briefly describe Professor Kwoka’s research project and turn to the particular suit that generated last month’s opinion.

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Professor Kwoka teaches at the University of Denver Strum School of Law. Her recent research focuses on FOIA and how it has strayed from its main purpose of allowing third party requesters (like the press and non profits) holding government accountable.  A 2016 article in the Duke Law Journal, FOIA, Inc.  chronicles the growth at some agencies of commercial FOIA requests, that is requests that are primarily motivated by commercial interests of the requesters. A 2018 article in the Yale Law Journal, First-Person FOIA, highlights the rapid growth in FOIA cases from people or their lawyers or other representatives seeking information about their particular case, often to use in other litigation or administrative actions. It is these FOIA cases that are made by so called first person requesters.

The First-Person FOIA article has particular resonance for people interested in tax administration, as practitioners and taxpayers frequently turn to FOIA to learn more about their case as they challenge an IRS determination. The article looks at agencies like the Department of Veterans Affairs and Social Security Administration and Professor Kwoka demonstrates that a “significant amount of first-person FOIA requesting serves as a means for private individuals to arm themselves when they are subject to governmental enforcement actions or seek to make their best case for a government benefit.”

First-Person FOIA makes the case that while FOIA provides a vehicle for people to get needed information about their cases it has significant shortcomings when used for that purpose. The article does not minimize the need for access to information; she suggests solutions for individual access outside of FOIA, including expanding individuals’ online access to information and limited administrative discovery. Yet Kwoka argues that while “these requests represent legitimate efforts by private individuals to obtain information about themselves, they serve largely private, not public interests.” That, as Kwoka notes, has led some observers to question FOIA’s value and perhaps will have the unintended effect of reducing its role as helping the public keep government accountable, a goal that seems as important today as it did in the post-Watergate era when sunshine laws like FOIA took root as one way to keep government accountable.

That takes us to the lawsuit that Professor Kwoka filed to get more information so she could properly catalogue the FOIA requests IRS received in FY 2015. In her study Kwoka sought information about requesters from 22 different agencies; only six gave her the information she needed; three provided the information in publicly available form on their websites. IRS was one of seven agencies that provided some information but due to withholdings or redactions Professor Kwoka could not use it in her study. That is what led to her suing the IRS to get more specific information about the FOIA requesters and their affiliations. In particular in her FOIA request, she sought “[t]he name of the requester for any third-party request (for first-party requests I accept this will be redacted)” and “[t]he organizational affiliation of the requester, if there is one.”

In the suit IRS relied on Exemptions 3 and 6 to withhold the names of the third party requesters and the organizational affiliations of the first and third party requesters. Exemption 3 essentially requires IRS to withhold information that is exempted from disclosure under another statute—the biggie in tax cases is the general restriction on release of taxpayer information in Section 6103. Exemption 6 allows an agency to withhold “personnel and medical files and similar files the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.”

With respect to its Exemption 3 defense, IRS argued that need not reveal the names or organizational affiliations of FOIA requesters because doing so could “reveal protected tax information including, but not limited to[,] the identity of a taxpayer.”   As part of its defense IRS pointed to the online log of FOIA requests that it maintains (see for example its FY 2015 log).  The IRS argued that if Kwoka obtained the names and organizational affiliation of third-party requesters, she could cross-reference that information with the online log and deduce the identities of the taxpayers.

The opinion pushed back on this, noting firstly that the topics the log lists are vague and more importantly  the “IRS’s conclusion does not follow from its premises.”

Even armed with the information she requests and the publicly accessible FOIA log, in most cases Kwoka could not know with any certainty the identity of particular taxpayers. Neither the log nor the information Kwoka requests generally reveals the target of a FOIA request—i.e., the person whose tax records the requester is seeking. Thus, for third-party requests in which a requester submits a request for someone else’s information, knowing the name and organizational affiliation of the requester (from her own FOIA request) in conjunction with the topic of the request (from the publicly accessible log) would not reveal the identity of the target of the request.

The requests for the organizational affiliations of the first-party requesters was a somewhat more nuanced issue, but there too the court sided with Kowka over the IRS argument that exemption 3 allowed a blanket excuse to withhold on all of the requested information:

In most cases, the same is true for first-party requesters who request their own tax return information. Kwoka concedes that the IRS can redact the names of first-party requesters, see FOIA Request; she asks only for their organizational affiliations. But because most organizations have many affiliated individuals, knowing a requester’s organizational affiliation—even in conjunction with the topic of the request—would not ordinarily reveal the identity of the requester (and thus the identity of the taxpayer). There may be a few exceptions where, for example, a particular organization has only one affiliate, or where a topic listed in the publicly accessible FOIA log is so specific (in contrast to the majority of the entries) that it would, in conjunction with the requester’s organizational affiliation, effectively reveal the first-party requester’s identity. See Def.’s Reply at 8 (arguing that “a FOIA request made by the owner of an individually held or closely held company, in concert with the subject of the request, would be enough to reveal the identity of the individual making the request”). Kwoka also concedes that “[w]here an individual requests tax records about the organization that is identical to the individual’s organizational affiliation as recorded in the IRS’s records, … the organizational affiliation would be subject to redaction.”

The opinion moved on to Exemption 6, which employs a balancing test and allows agencies to withhold certain information when disclosing it would result in a “clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.”  IRS argued that it could rely on Exemption 6 for a blanket witthhoding of the requested information For reasons similar to its rejection of Exemption 3, the court disagreed with the IRS:

For many of the same reasons the IRS is not entitled to a blanket invocation of exemption 3, it is not entitled to one under exemption 6. The IRS argues that “third-party FOIA requesters in this case [would] be subject to harassment, stigma, retaliation, or embarrassment if their identities were revealed” and that “[t]he average citizen has ample reason not to want the world to know that someone else has used the FOIA to obtain information regarding his federal tax liabilities, or his tax examination status.” But, as explained above, in most cases, revealing the organizational affiliations of first-party requesters and the names and organizational affiliations of third-party requesters would not reveal the targetof the request. Moreover, FOIA requesters “freely and voluntarily address[] their inquiries to the IRS, without a hint of expectation that the nature and origin of their correspondence w[ill] be kept confidential.” Stauss v. IRS, 516 F. Supp. 1218, 1223 [48 AFTR 2d 81-5617] (D.D.C. 1981)…

Conclusion

The case continues, as the court concluded that the IRS could not rely on Exemptions 3 and 6 to provide a categorical denial of Professor Kwoka’s request though it may in specific instances rely on those exemptions as a basis for redacting or withholding information.

Kudos to Professor Kwoka for her important research and her efforts to uncover more information about the nature of FOIA requests across the government.

District Court Allows IRS to Use Glomar Defense In FOIA Suit Seeking Whistleblower Info

This summer I discussed Mongomery v IRS, a FOIA case that was the latest in a long saga of litigation between the Montgomery family and the IRS.  This past month the district court returned to the FOIA dispute and partially resolved the case in favor of the government. In so doing it considered a so-called Glomar defense, when the government seeks to neither confirm nor deny the existence of the records that are the subject of a FOIA request.

As a refresher, the family’s partnership transactions attracted the attention of the IRS, leading to court opinions that upheld the determination that the partnerships were shams and that the IRS properly issued final partnership administrative adjustments, but also a separate refund suit that the IRS ultimately settled, leading to an almost $500,000 refund.  The Montgomerys filed a FOIA claim because they wanted to unearth how the IRS came to scrutinize the transacations, with a particular interest in finding out if there was an informant that spilled some of the partnership beans.

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To that end, they filed FOIA requests for two distinct categories of records: 1) various forms the IRS uses in connection with whistleblower cases and 2) lists, documents and correspondence with third parties concerning the partnership investments or the Montgomerys’ personal tax liability.

This past summer the court denied a summary judgment motion that the IRS filed that claimed that a settlement agreement the IRS and Montgomerys entered into prevented a FOIA suit. That opinion cleared the way for a decision on the merits of the FOIA suit, which takes us up to the district court opinion issued this past month and this post.

The main issue in the case involves the FOIA claims that sought the whistleblower information. IRS took what is known as a Glomar response, which is neither to deny nor confirm the existence of the records. This is a tactic the government has used in other types of cases but to my knowledge not in tax cases. The so-called Glomar response originates from the Cold War and the government’s desire to keep secret its efforts to uncover a sunken Soviet submarine:

In certain circumstances, […] an agency may refuse to confirm or deny that it has relevant records. This “Glomar response” derives from a ship, the Hughes Glomar Explorer, about which the CIA refused to confirm or deny the existence of records. See Phillippi v. CIA, 546 F.2d 1009, 1011 (D.C. Cir. 1976). Such responses are appropriate only when “`confirming or denying the existence of records would’ itself reveal protected information.” Bartko v. DOJ, 62 F. Supp. 3d 134, 141 (D.D.C. 2014) (quoting Nation Magazine v. U.S. Customs Serv., 71 F.3d 885, 893 (D.C. Cir. 1995)).

Despite Glomar having pedigree as a judicial exception to FOIA, the opinion notes that when the government raises a Glomar defense, it still needs to tether the defense to one of the nine statutory FOIA exemptions. In this case, the government asserted Exemption 7D:

Exemption 7(D) excludes from disclosure “records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes, but only to the extent that the production of such law enforcement records or information could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of a confidential source … [who] furnished information on a confidential basis.” 5 U.S.C § 552(b)(7)(D).

There was no disagreement over whether the records (if they existed) were filed for law enforcement purposes, which is the threshold requirement under 7D. Instead, the opinion turned on whether there was an expectation that the source (again if it or they existed) who spoke to the government expected the information to remain confidential. Yet as my parenthetical notes that question presupposes that an informant exists:

The difficulty here is that if the Government describes its interactions with a specific source, it would thereby undercut the protection that Glomar provides. In other words, because a Glomar response is meant to obscure the very existence of the source (or attempted source), the Government cannot offer any public statement concerning the confidentiality assurances given to that source (or a statement that no source exists). As the Service persuasively argues, even though the identity of an informant may not be at risk in every case, to protect whistleblowers in cases where disclosure of the existence of records could lead to their identification, it must assert Glomar whenever an informant is involved.

The opinion nicely frames how the court must consider not only the content of the documents but the possible harm arising from revealing the very existence of the documents:

For example, in a situation where there is only one suspected whistleblower, the Service’s affirmative or negative response to a request for certain forms would either confirm or refute the suspicion. Either the documents exist, in which case the identity of the informant could be apparent even if the IRS does not release anything, or they do not. Even though the non-existence of records does not implicate a harm cognizable under Exemption 7(D), the IRS can only protect against the damage that confirming such records would engender by asserting Glomar in all situations.

This suggests a robust role for asserting Glomar in the context of FOIA requests seeking information relating to informants. Yet the opinion notes that Glomar is not a blank check for the IRS in these cases, as the government must offer a public explanation why the exemption applies and then provide for in camera review to allow a district court judge to confirm the agency’s conclusions before it will allow Glomar to swat away the FOIA claims.

The government did that in this case, relying on IRS employee affidavits which attested to its policy of asserting Glomar consistently “when a requester seeks records pertaining to a confidential informant in order to protect the identity of whistleblowers” to avoid giving requesters sufficient information “to determine when [it] is protecting records and when there are no records to protect.”

During in camera review, the government was able to establish that either no records existed, or if they did exist, the informant had an express or implied expectation of privacy when dealing with the IRS. As such, the court granted the government’s summary judgment motion as relating to the FOIA request for forms the IRS uses in connection with whistleblower cases.

Conclusion

This is a significant victory for the IRS and paves the way for future Glomar responses in FOIA cases where someone is seeking information to determine if there was an informant that led to an IRS investigation.

It is not, however, the end of the line. Montgomery has also sought information pertaining to correspondence with other third parties concerning the partnership investments or their personal tax liability. That part of the FOIA dispute continues. Stay tuned for at least one more chapter in this case.

Court Rejects Prior Settlement From Barring Release of Documents in FOIA Claim

“Some on the street say snitches get stitches, but in this case they become the subject of Freedom of Information Act requests.” So starts Montgomery v US, one of the more interesting FOIA cases I have come across in this round of updates for the Saltzman Book IRS Practice and Procedure treatise.

I start by noting that “FOIA” and “interesting” do not usually find themselves paired. But in Montgomery, a district court opinion from earlier this year, the two fit nicely. In an opinion written by Judge James Boasberg, the same district court judge who wrote the opinion a few years ago in Loving v IRS, which struck down the testing and continuing education requirements for return preparers, Montgomery addresses a FOIA issue I had not previously seen-namely whether a prior settlement agreement can serve as a nonstatutory basis for the government’s withholding documents in a FOIA case.

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This case had its origins in the IRS’s examination of the taxpayers’ complex partnership transactions many years ago. As the opinion describes, the partnership transactions attracted the attention of the IRS, leading to opinions that upheld the determination that the partnerships were shams and that the IRS properly issued final partnership administrative adjustments, but also a separate refund suit that the IRS ultimately settled, leading to an almost $500,000 refund for the Montgomerys.

The settlement did not end the dispute. The Montgomerys filed a FOIA claim, convinced that the IRS troubles with the partnerships were the result of information that an informant provided to the IRS. The FOIA claim sought general information pertaining to the IRS investigation, but also specific forms the IRS uses when confidential informants trigger an investigation.

The case implicates FOIA Exemption 7D, which we discuss in Chapter 2 of the treatise, and which provides protection for “records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes [which] could reasonably be expected to disclose the identity of a confidential source…”

7D has a lot to unpack, and there has been a substantial amount of case law getting into its nooks and crannies, and we discuss that in Chapter 2.03[6] of the treatise.

This opinion, however, involves a preliminary defense that the Service raised in a motion for summary judgment. In settling the refund suit in 2014, the IRS and Montgomery entered into an agreement that “fully and final resolve[d] all ongoing disputes” among the IRS, the Montgomerys and their partnerships; the language in the agreement also referred to resolving all issues in “pending” lawsuits.

In justifying its refusing to hand over documents that the Montgomerys requested in the FOIA request, the government argued that the refund suit settlement agreement’s final resolution language barred the Montgomerys from bringing their FOIA case.

The problem, however, is that the settlement agreement, which resolved the ongoing disputes and pending litigation, predated the FOIA claim, which was filed a year or so after the agreement. Despite that challenge, the government argued that the Montgomerys in their refund suit had sought similar information in a motion for disclosure, and thus there was an “ongoing dispute” that brought the FOIA claim within the parties’ settlement agreement.

The court disagreed:

Where the IRS goes off track, however, is in conflating the underlying information that Plaintiffs seek with the device through which they are pursuing documents…. The Service cannot try to shoehorn this action into the Settlement Agreement simply because Plaintiffs’ end game is the same.

While the opinion rejected the government’s argument, the opinion notes that the outcome might have differed if in the prior litigation the taxpayers had sought information pursuant to Rule 34 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which allows for inspection of documents or electronically stored information and which the opinion notes  “might arguably be more akin to a FOIA request.”

Conclusion

For readers with an interest in FOIA, there is a bit more to this case, as the  opinion also rejects strained res judicata and collateral estoppel arguments the government raised in its motion.

Despite the initial win for the Montgomerys, the dispute continues, however, as the parties differ on the reach of the statutory basis for withholding of documents, as well as the applicability of a so-called Glomar denial, which is when the government refuses to confirm or deny information pertaining to a request. A Glomar denial has its origins in a case involving the CIA and the government’s withholding information relating to Project Azorian, a massive project to uncover a sunk Soviet sub. Its reach in FOIA cases involving the IRS and its possible use of informants is now squarely at issue in this case. Stay tuned.

 

 

 

The Freedom of Information Act and the Office of Professional Responsibility

Working for over three decades for Chief Counsel’s office, one of my goals was to avoid disclosure issues both on a personal and professional level. On a personal level, I wanted to know enough to keep out of trouble and on a professional level I wanted to avoid getting labeled as someone who knew disclosure law because that could lead to more assignments regarding disclosure issues which I did not want. At Chief Counsel’s office, FOIA was lumped in with IRC 6103 and the Privacy Act. Practicing at a clinic, I only want to know enough about the Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) to avoid having contact with it. Just as I did not want to know more about section 6103 than I needed in order to avoid trouble while working at Chief Counsel’s office, I do not want to learn more about OPR. I want to know the ethical rules but not what happens when you break them, because I hope that is knowledge I will never need.

Today’s case takes me into the confluence of two things I try to avoid and yet the case has important lessons worth discussion. In Waterman v. IRS, 121 AFTR2d 2018-__(D.D.C. 1-24-2018), the issue before the court is a request for records from OPR regarding an investigation of an attorney. The attorney, Brad Waterman, practices in D.C. and has for several decades. He graduated from my law school the year before me and we have met on several occasions. He has an excellent practice and the last time we met he was splitting his time between D.C. and Florida, depending on the season. The fact that he is seeking records from OPR concerning an investigation does not mean he engaged in inappropriate behavior. I know nothing about the investigation other than it was quickly closed which, it turns out, is his problem in this case. His case caused OPR to change its procedures despite, or maybe because of, his FOIA difficulties to make it easier for someone in his situation to obtain records from OPR.

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In representing a client in a matter involving a tax exempt bond, Mr. Waterman caused the revenue agent in the IRS Tax Exempt Bond office to feel that Mr. Waterman engaged in misconduct. The revenue agent, through his manager, made a referral to OPR. After investigation, OPR determined that “the allegation against Waterman did not warrant further inquiries or action.” I recently attended the ABA Tax Section meeting, at which I attended the Standards of Practice committee meeting in an effort to keep up on ethical issues. At that meeting, the director of OPR, Steve Whitlock, spoke and he talked about this case. I began writing this post on the plane to San Diego to attend the meeting. So, when the director started talking about this case, I woke up from my normal meeting stupor and started listening carefully. I hope I heard and understood him correctly.

Apparently, OPR decided not to pursue this case without sending out a letter to Mr. Waterman asking him for information. OPR regularly determines that many of the referrals it receives do not warrant further investigation and do not require making the referred individual submit material. When it makes this decision at the internal investigation stage, the case is closed with a letter to the individual informing the individual of the closure of the case without need for input from the individual. This was the normal procedure at the time OPR closed Mr. Waterman’s case. It was also, and still is I believe, the normal procedure for the OPR letter informing the individual of its conclusion to also inform the individual that OPR would retain the file on the matter for 25 years and that it reserved the right to reference the file in any future OPR investigations. Ouch. I suspect that receiving such a letter with the language about retention drove Mr. Waterman to want to know as much about the referral and investigation as possible in the event that it might have future ramifications.

The problem Mr. Waterman faced in trying to obtain information about the referral is that because OPR closed its investigation at the time of the sending of the letter, he could not use the section 6103 procedures, see here and here, that OPR suggests individuals use to obtain information about the referral. Had his case not been closed with an early letter, he would have instead received a far more ominous letter informing him of the investigation and asking him to respond to the allegations. In that situation, OPR would not have a closed investigation but a very open one. During an open investigation, OPR suggests that individuals use the section 6103 process to obtain information about the investigation. Because his investigation was closed by the time Mr. Waterman knew he wanted information, he could not use the section 6103 procedure and instead had to revert to FOIA in order to try to obtain the information.

The OPR director stated at the ABA meeting that because of this case, OPR was changing its procedures. Now, instead of issuing the one letter and closing the case immediately, it is going to issue a preliminary letter giving the target individual 60 days to make a statement to OPR and to obtain information about the investigation through section 6103. See the following paragraph for a link to this letter. Now, a recipient of this “good” OPR letter, if there is such a thing, can use the section 6103 procedures for obtaining information before OPR closes its case 60 days later. If someone receiving this good letter fails to ask for information about the investigation under section 6103 during that 60 day period, then they will face the same FOIA obstacles which Mr. Waterman encountered and which I will discuss below. I hope that neither I nor any reader will need the benefit of this knowledge, but just in case I provide it for any who have the misfortune of a referral.

Attached to the outline created by the director of OPR for his presentation at the ABA meeting were samples of the three letters sent by OPR. The first letter is called the pre-allegation letter. This is the letter alerting the recipient of an OPR investigation that is not being dropped after the initial internal review by OPR. The second letter is called the “soft conduct letter – initial” This is the letter giving the recipient the chance to request information from OPR using IRC 6103 and avoiding the problems faced by Mr. Waterman. This letter would be sent to someone that OPR determines not to investigate further after reviewing the incoming allegations. The third letter is called the “soft conduct letter” which should be sent about 60 days after the initial soft conduct letter and which would inform the recipient that OPR was closing its investigation.

The FOIA case does not discuss the merits of the investigation. From the opinion, it is clear that Mr. Waterman made informal requests for information about the investigation and did not receive everything that he wanted. So, he made a formal FOIA request. In responding to the FOIA request, the IRS withheld certain information asserting primarily FOIA exemption 5, which “allows agencies to withhold information that would not be available by law to a party … in litigation with the agency.”

In the FOIA case, Mr. Waterman agreed that the IRS search for the requested records was adequate. I want to take a brief detour here to mention another recent FOIA case, Ayyad v. IRS, No. 8-16-cv-03032 (D. Md. 2-2-2018). In the Ayyad case, the requester did not agree that the search for the records was adequate and for good reason. An examination of the taxpayer was pending for about a decade when they filed the FOIA request seeking records, which included the administrative file developed by the revenue agent including all written correspondence relating to the examination. With relatively amazing speed for a FOIA case, the IRS identified 2,885 pages of responsive records but did not produce a Vaughn index detailing the redacted and withheld records. After the taxpayers filed their FOIA suit, the IRS informed the Court it found an additional 872 pages. Later, after the taxpayer stated records were still missing, the IRS found another 6,568 pages. Needless to say, the IRS did not cover itself in glory in this case and did not prevail. Its inadequate searches and its failures to submit proper Vaughan indices resulted in an unfavorable FOIA decision. So, it is not unimportant that Mr. Waterman agreed with the IRS search. His case was much less involved and he undoubtedly knew what records were out there, but the Ayyad case provides a note of caution in relying on the first submission of records from the IRS.

In Mr. Waterman’s case, the court found that the Vaughn index properly described the withheld documents and the basis for the exemption (also a major issue in the Ayyad case). The documents at issue were pre-deliberative and involved material created by the revenue agent who made the referral, his manager, preliminary findings of the OPR investigator, and an email between OPR and counsel. The court finds all of the documents meet the test under FOIA exemption 5. If I understood Mr. Whitlock correctly, Mr. Waterman would have received the referring documents under a section 6103 request made during an open OPR investigation. I do not believe he would receive the other two documents under section 6103.

I am very sympathetic with Mr. Waterman’s right to know the basis for the investigation. Because OPR is retaining the records for 25 years, he has genuine concerns. I applaud OPR for changing its procedures to allow other similarly situated individuals to obtain records under the more friendly section 6103 procedures. I hope the information in this post is information you and I will never need to know.

 

Court Orders Release of IRS Documents Despite Deliberative Process Privilege

Government agencies enjoy the cloak of the deliberative process privilege to protect from discovery in court or in FOIA proceedings internal deliberations that are part of their decision making process. Anadarko Petroleum v United States, a recent district court magistrate’s order, illustrates that the protection is not absolute, resulting in possible disclosure of a range of IRS documents that perhaps will shed light on how the agency apparently changed its view on a technical loss deferral regulation under Section 267.

I will summarize the issue and case below.

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Anadarko brought a $25 million refund suit; the substantive issue involved its taking a loss that arose from a liquidation of one of its subsidiaries. The precise question concerned whether a deferral of the loss ended in 2007, when Anadarko liquidated its subsidiary in a taxable liquidation. The government argued that the deferral should have continued, consistent with a regulation Treasury promulgated under Section 267 in 2012 and which Treasury claimed at the time was clarifying existing rules.

In the suit, Anadarko served interrogatories and sought a variety of documents that it felt showed that the 267 regulations did not clarify existing rules because IRS had previously taken differing views on the issue. It asked for documents relating to private letter ruling, a Chief Counsel advisory opinion and even an ABA Tax Section presentation at or around the time of finalizing the regs.

The government argued that the deliberative process privilege insulated the documents from discovery. That privilege essentially keeps from FOIA requests or court discovery agency predecisional documents, including the types that Anadarko sought.

While the privilege is a powerful cloak, it is not absolute. Courts are supposed to weigh the government’s strong interest in protecting full access to how it comes to a decision with the need of the party seeking the requested documents.

In concluding that Anadarko’s need trumped the agency’s interest the magistrate focuses on how agency changes on an issue may be relevant in a court’s legal interpretation. It did not matter, in the magistrate’s view, that the request considered documents that did not in and of themselves directly relate to precedential agency determinations.

In concluding that the government had to comply with the discovery, the court also felt that the request was proportional and reasonable, in light of the amount at issue and the costs to the government in complying. Backstopping its proportionality conclusion was its view that the nonprecedential documents had a bearing on the court’s ultimate task of sorting out the merits of the taxpayer and government’s views of  Section 267 and the regs.

Conclusion

Anadarko is an important taxpayer victory. I am not well versed with the substantive issue in this case. I suspect, however, that the court’s willingness to allow discovery has a lot to do with what the magistrate believes is at a minimum a less than complete explanation accompanying the regs. If IRS takes differing views on a technical issue, and yet when promulgating a final regulation Treasury claims that it is merely clarifying what the law had been all along, a court (and taxpayers) are justifiably curious as to how that explanation jives with what came before the final reg.

District Court Pokes Facebook FOIA Request

Like many social media and tech companies, Facebook has drawn IRS scrutiny over its licensing of technology to low tax offshore affiliates. That dispute is in Tax Court. Seeking to obtain information about the IRS audit, Facebook filed a FOIA request seeking documents related to the dispute. The FOIA request has now generated its own separate litigation.

Not surprisingly, the files IRS has on the Facebook exam are voluminous and it asked Facebook to extend the time to respond to the request. While the IRS served up thousands of pages of records, it did not provide all Facebook wanted. Facebook sought to compel the IRS to issue responsive documents in electronic format. Last month’s district court opinion held that Facebook was not entitled to the records in that format.

While we do not discuss FOIA frequently in PT, we have recently revised our FOIA discussion in the Saltzman and Book treatise. FOIA is an important tool for practitioners seeking information relating to tax disputes. There are some interesting procedural aspects of the Facebook FOIA case.

Facebook emphasizes that if a requester wants documents in electronic format, the request itself must clearly say so. The original Facebook request did not indeed indicate the format that the company wanted the documents. As the opinion notes, [i]t asked for all records ‘whether maintained in electronic or hardcopy format,’ but did not specify the format for production.”

While the Facebook opinion stated that “metadata is an important part of electronic records in today’s world…” the opinion emphasized that without a specific request for a document in a particular form the courts have no basis to order production because there was no valid FOIA request in the first instance:

With respect to its request for electronic-format documents, then, Facebook did not submit a valid FOIA request in compliance with the IRS’s regulations. The request did not trigger the IRS’s FOIA obligations, the IRS did not have an opportunity to exercise its discretion in analyzing the request, and so Facebook has not exhausted its administrative remedies.

A separate and somewhat academic discussion in the opinion considered whether the exhaustion requirement was jurisdictional. There is a split on that issue; some courts have concluded that the exhaustion requirement is a prudential consideration rather than a jurisdictional prerequisite. Facebook argued that even in fact it was a jurisdictional requirement the court could find that ordering Facebook to submit a revised FOIA request was futile (thus allowing the court to compel production in electronic format).

The court declined to resolve the jurisdictional versus prudential dispute, emphasizing that even if the request were not jurisdictional courts waive the exhaustion requirement only if the waiver was consistent with the purpose of the exhaustion requirement:

Whether analyzed prudentially or jurisdictionally (with a futility exception), the ultimate question is the same: does the failure to exhaust undermine the purposes and policies of FOIA exhaustion — i.e. to give the IRS a chance to exercise its discretion and to review its decisionmaking process before judicial intervention? Put another way: would dismissal promote that purpose?

The answer here is yes. Judicial intervention now would deprive the IRS the opportunity to exercise its discretion and analyze Facebook’s (now clarified) request for electronic documents and metadata, and dismissal would give the IRS the chance to do so. The court is not convinced that Facebook’s refiling of a revised FOIA request to specify the format (and content) of the records it seeks would be futile.

Conclusion

The opinion is a careful reminder that what often takes the form of boilerplate requests for information in fact can have practical significance if a FOIA dispute winds up in court. As some disputes can relate to administrative files with millions of documents, and as the world increasingly becomes digital, litigants seeking information from the IRS must be careful and precise when seeking information.