IRS Whiff on Timeliness of Refund Claim Prevents Payment of Refund If Taxpayer Fails to File Suit Within Two Years

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What happens if a taxpayer timely files a refund claim, IRS denies the claim because it mistakenly believes that the claim is untimely and the taxpayer fails to files a refund suit within two years? To top it off, IRS, outside the two-year window for filing suit, realizes that it made an initial mistake in rejecting the claim on SOL grounds?

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A recent email released as Chief Counsel Advice describes this scenario. As the email notes, that the IRS later acknowledges the claim as timely does not grant the IRS the power to reconsider its earlier denial if the two year period for filing suit in federal court has passed. 

A quick statutory background on refunds. As to filing a suit, Section 7422 authorizes a suit for refund for taxpayers who believe they have overpaid taxes (or are entitled to an excess of refundable credits). Section 7422 authorizes such a suit only once the taxpayer has submitted an administrative claim for refund with the Service. Section 6532 prevents suits 1) until at least six months have passed after filing the claim (unless there is an earlier denial) or 2)  “after the expiration of 2 years from the date of mailing by certified mail or registered mail by the Secretary to the taxpayer of a notice of the disallowance of the part of the claim to which the suit or proceeding relates.”

The email/advice does not provide the underlying facts but as many readers (and my suffering procedure students learn) is that the 6511(a) and 6511(b) SOL refund rules and limitations on amount can be tough.  The email flags that the timeliness of the claim issue in question relates to Section 7503, which provides rules for when the last day for performing an act falls on a weekend or holiday.  The advice acknowledges that the  refund claim was in fact timely when taking into account Section 7503.

As the advice notes, if a taxpayer has not in fact filed suit, under Section 6514(a)(2) a refund issued after the two-year period in 6532 is considered erroneous. As such, the taxpayer is out of luck unless there was some procedural defect with the IRS’s denial of the refund, such as a failure to be sent to the proper address or a failure to send by certified or registered email. 

What would happen if the IRS had issued the refund after the two-year period had lapsed?  Then the payment would be an erroneous refund, allowing the IRS to recover under erroneous refund procedures, leading to yet another complex set of rules that delight tax professors and annoy students and taxpayers alike.

The situation highlights the at times unfairness of the SOL rules. Whether the time period for an action is jurisdictional or generally subject to equitable exceptions is a topic we have discussed frequently. Bryan Camp has thoroughly discussed these issues in a recent Tax Lawyer article where he explores why he believes the refund suit rules in Section 7422 and Section 6532 are not jurisdictional.  To that end see also a PT post from Carl Smith discussing a district court case from the ED of Washington where the court equitably tolled the 6532(a) filing deadline, citing the Volpicelli case from the 9th Cir. holding that the 6532(c) wrongful levy suit filing deadline is not jurisdictional and is subject to equitable tolling. The brief CCA does not go down this rabbit hole, but I note that IRS does not accept Volpicelli, and this topic is one courts will continue to address.

About Leslie Book

Professor Book is a Professor of Law at the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law.

Comments

  1. Kenneth H. Ryesky, Esq. says

    Before collecting the money as an attorney for the IRS, I was spending the money as a Procurement Agent and Contracting Officer for the Department of Defense (until getting kicked upstairs to a higher-grade Analyst position, but that story strays too far from the current subject matter).

    One quote frequently drilled into us during the many training courses DoD gave us was Mr. Justice Holmes’s “Men must turn square corners when they deal with the Government.” Rock Island Railroad Co. v. United States, 254 U.S. 141, 143 (1920). [This presumably applies to women as well.]

    And so, thought I, shouldn’t the government also have to turn square corners?

    It is only now, after googling the quotation and finding the Rock Island RR case, that I finally realize that the case was actually a taxation case and not a government contract dispute case.

    So with CCA_2020111814425340, it seems that the IRS does not need to turn square corners when dealing with the taxpayer.

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